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11-18-18 07:43:40 PM

Jul - Computers and Technology - Reliable hard drive models & manufacturers? New poll - New thread - New reply
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xdaniel
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Posted on 02-18-18 02:57:33 PM Link | Quote
My 500 GB Seagate hard drive gave me a wonderful birthday present today! It died. Taking along a ton of music, ROMs, backups, and so on. It's no longer recognized on bootup; it doesn't even output anything over serial, while another 40 GB Seagate I have does.

So, I need a replacement - one that's not too terribly expensive, but also not likely to fail within the first year or two. But the last drive I bought was my 1 TB Samsung Spinpoint (still in good health!) back in 2010, so I have no idea which manufacturers and models today are good, which are bad, or hell, which ones still exist! Samsung doesn't make 'em anymore, apparently their HDD business was bought by Seagate.

Looking around, the only(?) manufacturers these days are Seagate, WD and Toshiba, and... all three seem to be a bit of a crapshoot? With drives said to be failing or getting slower after very short periods of time, and in turn people recommending staying away from one brand and getting one from the other, while other people say the opposite, etc...

On the positive side, since there's only these three left, making a shortlist of drives was easy - all are 2 TB, SATA 3 (6 Gb/s), 3.5" and not too expensive (around 60 Euro):

- Seagate Barracuda (ST2000DM006)
- WD Blue (WD20EZRZ)
- Toshiba P300 (HDWD130[?])

...now which one would you recommend, tho? I'm seeing similar reviews and such for all three of these. Do you have any of these, or any similar drives from the same manufacturer? Have you been happy with the drive or had any issues?
andlabs
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Posted on 02-18-18 03:06:01 PM Link | Quote
I have had no issues with Western Digital drives so far. I will say you should only go for internal drives, and I have the software project to explain why.
Joe
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Posted on 02-18-18 05:50:41 PM Link | Quote
I work in a datacenter.

There's basically no correlation between manufacturer and reliability, nor is there any correlation between the reliability of one model and the reliability of another.

Back up your data.
xdaniel
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Posted on 02-18-18 06:03:20 PM (last edited by xdaniel at 02-18-18 06:05:56 PM) Link | Quote
...yeah, the "back up your data" part is where I failed hard. Hell, I did notice CrystalDiskInfo showing me a freaking health warning for the drive, but I was dragging my feet! And that's what I get, very much deservedly so, I guess...

Anyway, I'll see if I can pick up a new drive in town tomorrow, otherwise I'll order one on Amazon. As for backups, what I'm thinking is to...

1) Install the new drive, gather all the important data I want/need to be backed up on it.
2) Next month (because cost), get another drive of the same size - either an external drive (tho not a WD as per andlabs), or an internal one plus a USB 3.0 enclosure.
3) Run regular, (semi-)automated backups from the new internal drive to the external drive, and only use the external drive to store that backup data.

...and 4), in case of another catastrophic failure, have the external drive (with at worst minor data loss) ready to copy its contents back to a new internal drive.

Does that sound sensible?
Kazinsal
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Posted on 02-18-18 06:49:16 PM Link | Quote
Originally posted by Joe
I work in a datacenter.

There's basically no correlation between manufacturer and reliability, nor is there any correlation between the reliability of one model and the reliability of another.

Back up your data.


Seconding this. They're all good these days. I've got a mix of WDs and Seagates spread over the past five years in my machine -- some enterprise, some not -- and haven't had problems with any of them.
Lunaria

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Posted on 02-18-18 07:55:59 PM Link | Quote
HHDs have a small failure rate from factory production, like, a few disks per batch is bad and they die within the first few years. But you can't really know that when you get them, it's worth it to plan around it even if you're very, very, unlikely to get one of the bad ones when you buy them.

Like, IIRC, it's was either around 0.2% or 0.02% of disks.

But yeah, just buy whatever brand, shouldn't be that bad.
xdaniel
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Posted on 02-19-18 01:04:02 PM Link | Quote
Thanks for the information and reassurance. I ended up going for the 2 TB WD Blue (WD20EZRZ-00Z5HB0) because it was in stock at a local store for 63 Euro. Installed it about 3 hours ago, and am now shoveling data onto it, tho nothing irreplaceable quite yet, just in the unlikely event it might be a dud.

I also am most likely going to go the "get another drive next month for regular backups, and only backups" route; probably another WD Blue like this one, plus a USB 3.0 enclosure for it.
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Posted on 08-21-18 07:29:57 AM Link | Quote
I quit using Seagate after one drive I had kept making nasty noises and eventually failed. I always keep stuff backed up externally though, around every 4 months or so I run a backup.
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Posted on 08-23-18 09:09:00 PM Link | Quote
Originally posted by Zeether
I quit using Seagate after one drive ...


I quit using WD after one drive, too...

Gabu

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Posted on 09-02-18 03:50:10 PM Link | Quote
I've two Seagate hard drives, one 1 TB bought in 2009 that Defraggler is noting that it could go in the next year or two, and a 5 TB one that I deadass almost bricked.

Don't defrag under the influence, but on the flip side, it did help that I kept calm during the kerfuffle. But I am gonna keep an eye on it.
ひりゅう
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Posted on 10-20-18 01:09:20 PM Link | Quote
If it's a DM00x (x being any number) in the last five digits of a Seagate model number, run. I've replaced so many of them (and two for myself, one coming from Seagate as a refurb to replace my dead one on cross-ship) I've lost count. I have absolutely no idea what is up with the technology that they use but they all die a fearsome death and I believe had a 40% failure rate over one year when it originally released. Bad is over 5. Ironically, their 8TB+ NM00x models that are gas-filled are almost immortal. I'm not entirely certain what changed but perhaps that gas does it all.

WD is all right. HGST is better overall. I'd probably tell you look at BackBlaze for comparison of failure rates and make your own judgement.
Kazinsal
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Posted on 10-20-18 10:59:48 PM (last edited by Kazinsal at 10-20-18 11:00:28 PM) Link | Quote
The helium-filled Seagates are usually shingled magnetic recording (SMR) drives so they're a bit slower but have incredible density and reliability.

The WD EasyStore or WD Elements external drives have either a WD Red or the HGST equivalent inside them, so you can get one of those on the cheap and rip the enclosure off for a decent, reliable hard drive.

e: HGST is owned by WD and OEMs most of their high quality drives.
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Jul - Computers and Technology - Reliable hard drive models & manufacturers? New poll - New thread - New reply




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